Powered by Huaxinzl!

November, 2018

Which new streaming stand-up comedy specials are worth your time?

By the time you finish this sentence, another comedian will get their wings – that is, a new stand-up special on your streaming site of choice.
Nanjing Night Net

Like a rapper at a strip joint, Netflix chief Ted Sarandos has been flinging money into the medium, enticing the likes of Dave Chappelle and Chris Rock to return to the stage with a cool $US40 million apiece for a pair of new specials (Chappelle’s just released, Rock’s yet to come). Jerry Seinfeld, who’ll debut two of his own later this year, will reportedly score $US100 million for his work.

Meanwhile, Stan recently launched its own six-part series One Night Stan, highlighting an hour of weekly laughs from local stars like Wil Anderson and Judith Lucy.

For stand-up lovers, the abundance and accessibility is better than ever, with a new special popping up on streaming sites at a clip of almost two a week. For those lacking time or patience for epic episodic binges, a 50-odd minute dip is ideal – but the selection is overwhelming.

These new specials are among the best places to start.

Louis CK: 2017 (Netflix)

It’s odd seeing CK in a salesman’s suit rather than his sloppy dad jeans, but nothing else’s changed: his new special opens with a typically polarising dumb gag… about abortions. “It’s either like taking a s— or killing a baby,” he says – and you’re either onboard with a resigned shake of your head or you’re out.

That goofy irreverence filters through the special, baiting offence on religious views (“Admit it, the Christians won,” he says, citing the fact we use Jesus’s age as our measurement of time) and identity politics, where he ponders coming out after getting turned on by a Matthew McConaughey quote from Magic Mike.

Like his sitcom though, the highs are inspired by his children. A bit on the Elizabethan parlour antics of primary school dating takes on an awkward R-rated twist, and another on the ancient myth of Achilles’ heel leads to unlikely parenting advice – all, like the special itself, singularly CK.

Amy Schumer: The Leather Special (Netflix)

Amy Schumer’s made a career “working blue”, poking the double standards of what a female comic is allowed to riff on. But Leather takes that shtick and runs with it.

She’s as explicit as ever about her personal life, including an extended rant on genital cleanliness and her somewhat lacking sex life with her partner (I’d like to be more detailed, but this piece would be deleted).

She also effortlessly shifts from the funny to serious, following a bit on getting, uh, pleasured by a cabbie with a devastating reflection on the Trainwreck cinema shooting that left two people dead and nine others injured in 2015.

Or, as Schumer candidly puts it: “You can catch a hot load all over your titties and still not want your loved ones to get shot in a theatre.” Someone should stitch that on a doily.

Celia Pacquola: The Looking Glass (Stan)

“I’d just like to really burst the bubble early on, just in case there’s anyone in the room who was thinking, ‘Let’s go see that nice girl from the ABC do jokes about infrastructure,'” jokes Celia Pacquola about 10 minutes into her Stan special, right after a joke about farting on a hook-up’s crotch.

Yep, this isn’t so much the endearing straight-woman from Utopia or Rosehaven, but Pacquola as self-deprecating stand-up spilling on the anxiety of being a single, 30-something, beer-swilling, Miranda Kerr-despising, karaoke tyrant.

Tom Ballard: The World Keeps Happening (Stan)

Besides a personal excursion into gonorrhea tests, the issues covered during Ballard’s Stan special read like a laundry list of hot topics, which is either courageous or nuts.

He turns his yell-y invective towards clicktivism, runners, male feminists, the Catholic Church, Invasion Day, the gay marriage debate, veganism, euthanasia, and rowers (“the boat people we should be worried about”). Someone give this dude a Daily Show-esque TV gig already.

Bill Burr: Walk Your Way Out (Netflix)

It’s to Bill Burr’s credit that his me against the world, PC-baiting persona never renders him unlikeable. Maybe it’s the unhinged giggle after each manic rant that says “Meh, even I don’t think I’m serious”, but as his guest spots on Conan have proved, he’s one of the best real-talkers around, a no-nonsense voice of the people, if those people liked to craft Hall of Fame lists about genocidal dictators or ponder what would happen if Kanye was white.

Like a modern-day Sam Kinison, there’s no one better at vein-popping, curmudgeonly absurdity – just take his plan to fix the world’s overpopulation problem by randomly wiping out holiday cruiseships.

Dave Chappelle: The Age Of Spin and Deep In The Heart Of Texas (Netflix)

Much has been made of Chappelle’s Spin, a controversial return for the infamous recluse that features a cynical riff on trans acceptance and a flippant defence of Bill Cosby’s legacy (“He rapes but he saves – and he saves more than he rapes,” goes the punchline).

Texas, shot months earlier, also reveals Chappelle’s antagonistic turns with audiences, when he takes a knee after deriding a female heckler and launches into a chest-prodding monologue on women’s body parts (there’s a solid Lil Wayne impression in there, but still). It all makes for a rather uncomfortable comeback.

When he’s not just pushing buttons though, the legend’s there: a ridiculously casual stage presence showcasing stellar storytelling skills, whether defending his decision to go to the Oscars over a Flint, Michigan benefit (“What am I, a f—ing superhero?”) or taking jealous jabs at fellow comedian Kevin Hart’s success. Out of touch? Probably. But it’s still riveting.

Unexpected sleepers: Other pleasant surprises from a streaming stand-up deep dive

Colin Quinn: The New York Story (Netflix)

The Tough Crowd (RIP) motormouth packs a ton into this universal tribute to city immigrants, seen through NYC’s working class docks and bodegas. This set, directed by Jerry Seinfeld and based on Quinn’s own celebrated Off Broadway show, proves that non-PC jokes can be used to affectionately honour our differences rather than ridicule.

Cristela Alonzo: Lower Classy (Netflix)

Alonzo’s special is perfectly suited to the current social climate, taking on Trump’s America with incredulous glee – but the personal is just as political. “Even in my fantasies, I can’t give Latinos better jobs?” she says, recalling her childhood dream of being the maid on New Kids On The Block’s tour bus.

Jen Kirkman: Just Keep Livin’? (Netflix)

Kirkman’s first Netflix special I’m Gonna Die Alone (And I Feel Fine) was a thrilling discovery, the outspoken feminist in full autobiographical mode on things like dating younger men and not wanting kids. Her new special is even more ambitious, casual quips spinning into prescient yarns, like a killer closing bit about finding out one of her male friends was a catcaller.

Gad Elmaleh: Gad Gone Wild (Netflix)

Elmaleh, a megastar in France thanks to hit movies like Priceless (2006) with Audrey Tatou, is a sort of Moroccan Jerry Seinfeld, his dry observational chops squeezing off-kilter gags from subjects as mundane as catching a taxi or ordering wine at a restaurant in LA. The gleeful way he takes the piss out of American elitism (as only the French can do) should make you forget you’re reading subtitles.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

2017 Sail Port Stephens weekend program a busy onephotos, videos

2017 Sail Port Stephens weekend program a busy one | photos, videos SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Sea Hawk won division one. Picture: Salty Dingo
Nanjing Night Net

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. A classic timber boat, Vittoria, was a standout amongst the fibreglass vessels that raced as part of the 60-boat fleet. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. A classic timber boat, Vittoria, was a standout amongst the fibreglass vessels that raced as part of the 60-boat fleet. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. A classic timber boat, Vittoria, was a standout amongst the fibreglass vessels that raced as part of the 60-boat fleet. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. A classic timber boat, Vittoria, was a standout amongst the fibreglass vessels that raced as part of the 60-boat fleet. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. A Hawk 127 as part of the RAAF fly-over. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. A trio of RAAF Hawk 127’s fly over the sailing. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

SPS17: Commodore’s Cup, day three, Sail Port Stephens. Picture: Salty Dingo

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Small changes add up

Look ahead: Year three students Mathew Lambkin, Nadia Brownrigg and Keely Graham with preschool community engagement officer Nicole Harrison, who painted the mural on the outdoor ping pong table. Pictures: Simone De PeakWALK into Windale Public School at lunchtime and you maythink you’d stumbled upon a party.
Nanjing Night Net

Students pour out of classrooms to dance to music pumping over the public announcement system, queue at a colourful outdoor ping pong table and then lie down for a few minutes of mindfulness and meditation before they return to learning.

Creative: The flexible classroom design – including desks at different heights – is available to year six but will eventually be rolled out to the whole school.

Principal Cindy Sadler smiles when she surveys the bustling scene. The initiatives have been driven by the Student Representative Council, which she revived at the start of 2017after it lay dormant for many years.

Pride: About 35 per cent of the students at Windale are Aboriginal. Nicole Harrison’s mural uses intersecting circles to represent the school, parents and community.

“We wanted to hear from students about what they wanted – and for them to know they have a voice,” Ms Sadler said. “Regardless of where the kids are from, their ability level, their family situation, we believe every child should have the best opportunities possible, equal to what they would get at any other school across the state.”

Ms Sadler joined Windale at the start of term three last year and is the first person to permanently step into the headmaster’s chair since Rick Budden left in mid 2014. In the 10months since, she has implemented a raft of changes staff saidhave strengthenedthe school and improved student behaviour and academic performance.

It hasn’talways been a straight-forwardtask. The average Family Occupation and Education Index, aschool socio-economic index, is 100.Windale Public’sis 184.

Staff member Christine Clifford said several of the students live in public housing, come from families experiencing long-term unemployment and have not been exposed toachievement.

Mrs Clifford said it was unfortunate some students saw or heard negativity associated with their suburb.

“It’s not what they deserve,” she said. “What’s happening in the community is not necessarily happening in the school and perceptions of what is happening in the community arenot always correct.

“We’re building students who are going to go into the community as the next generation and improve it. They can do whatever students elsewhere can do.”

Ms Sadler agreed and said she encouraged students to not let stereotypes or their circumstancesdefine or limit them. “We can’t raise leaders of tomorrow with yesterday’s thinking,” she said. “We have high expectations of kids, staff and our community and everyone has lifted. We expect kids to achieve and they do.”

The school’s latest NAPLAN results were at a level close to schools serving students from statistically similar backgrounds. Its year three average writing results were above the average at other similar schools.

“It’s only one part of what we look at, it’s good because it does allow us to compare ourselves to other schools across the state but it’s only one aspect of what we do,” she said. “I’m more interested in what’s happening on a daily basis for all students, not just years three and five on one day.”

She also usesAustralian education researcher John Hattie’saverage effect size, whichmeasures both the improvement in achievement for a group and the variation of student performances expressed on a standardised scale.

The average effect size across all students is 0.40 per year, which almost all of her 2016 year five studentsachieved compared to when they were in year three.Many achieved well beyond the average, including up to 2.6695 over two years.

Ms Sadler hasalso introduced new awards and trophies for students, flexible learning spaces including standing desks for year six and paid fornew guernseys for the football team, robotics lessons and weekly coding lessons for all students.

Teachers encourage students to bring their outstanding work to Ms Sadler’s office, where she has an open door policy and reviews theirefforts.

“The kids are responding –they’re working hard because they’re seeing results,” she said.

“We’re focusing on the growth mindset, so they’re starting to understand learning is not always easy but the important part is continuing to try.”

Ms Sadler’s said the school had suffered adecline in enrolments–from252 in 2013 to 160 in 2017– due to a lack of young families coming to the area.

But she points to what she feels is a more telling,promising sign: about 10children who live in Windale’scatchment area but started kindergartenelsewhere have enrolled or will soon jointhe school.

Australian Test star fined in wake of drunken tirade

Australian and NSW Blues spinner Stephen O’Keefe has been sanctioned by Cricket Australia after being involved in an incident at a Cricket NSW function where he made highly inappropriate comments whilst under the influence of alcohol.
Nanjing Night Net

According to a CA release on Friday morning, O’Keefe was charged with a breach of Article 2.2.11 of the Code – conduct unbecoming of a representative. As this is O’Keefe’s second offence within the last 18 months, a fine of $20,000 was proposed and accepted. O’Keefe will also undergo further appropriate counselling. Given he accepted the proposed sanction and charge, no hearing was required.

In addition, O’Keefe will be excluded from consideration for selection by NSW for the 2017 One-Day Domestic tournament.

Cricket NSW CEO Andrew Jones said: “Stephen has not upheld the standards expected of a NSW and Australian cricketer in the aftermath of the India tour where he proudly represented his state and country.

“As this is his second recent offence we believe a strong penalty is appropriate. At Cricket NSW, we want all our people to achieve their potential on and off the field and Stephen needs to refocus himself on that task.”

CA Executive General Manager, Team Performance, Pat Howard added: “There is no time or place for unacceptable behaviour from any of our players in Australian Cricket, and we continue to take a zero-tolerance approach to this”.

“We’re extremely disappointed this situation occurred, particularly on the back of a previous incident, and it now overshadows Stephen’s on field performance on the recent tour of India.

Speaking on the sanction O’Keefe said: “At an official Cricket NSW function I became intoxicated and made highly inappropriate comments. There is no excuse for this and I take full responsibility and offer an unconditional apology.

“I accept the sanctions imposed by Cricket Australia and Cricket NSW and welcome the chance to receive specialist counselling.

“I have a big challenge ahead and I am determined to meet it with actions, not just words.

“To all of the members of the cricket family I love and respect so much, again, apologies for letting you down.”

smh南京夜网419论坛

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Squad on clean-up mission

Squad on clean-up mission EVIDENCE: Part of a 40-tonne dump of material near Kurri Kurri, which is being investigated by the Hunter-Central Coast Regional Illegal Dumping Squad. Picture: Marina Neil
Nanjing Night Net

RID Squad inspectors Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson examining the illegally dumped waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

RID Squad inspectors Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson examining the illegally dumped waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

RID Squad inspectors Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson examining the illegally dumped waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

RID Squad inspectors Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson examining the illegally dumped waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

Part of a pile of illegally dumped commercial waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

RID Squad inspectors Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson examining the illegally dumped waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

RID Squad inspectors Rob Robertson and Shane Bowker examining the illegally dumped waste near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

RID Squad inspectors Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson, near Kurri Kurri. Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Hunter-Central Coast RID Squad coordinator Rob Robertson, keeping an eye out for illegal dumpers

RID Squad investigators Shane Bowker and Rob Robertson

Hunter-Central Coast RID Squad coordinator Rob Robertson inspects concrete believed to be illegally dumped in a creek in Awaba

TweetFacebookThe squad has to deal with some large cases of illegal dumping by commercial operators. The motivation for commercial dumping, Rob Robertson says, is “100 per cent financial”, as operators try to save or make money.

On a road just off a roundabout in the Hunter Economic Zone near Kurri Kurri, there is a huge moundof waste, about 40 tonnes of it, which was dumped on the night of February 20.

Rob Robertson meets up with one of his investigators, Shane Bowker. They examine the waste, which Mr Robertson says isprocessed materialfrom some sort of recycling centre.Wearing a mask and gloves, Shane Bowker picks up a piece that looks like asbestos.

“We took half a dozen samples because it looks like asbestos, but it’s not,” Mr Robertson explains.

In the eyes of Rob Robertson and Shane Bowker, there is evidence in thiscompressed pile of waste, as they tease out pieces that could set up a trail back to who was responsible.

“What we’ll be looking for in this material are documents that will probably take us back to different building and demolition sites, either around Newcastle or in Sydney,” Mr Robertson says.“What we’ll be doing is following the trail of those documents into the skip bin at those sites and finding out where those skip bins went for consolidation before all that material was then loaded onto a truck, the remains of which we see here.”

Rob Roberston and his squad don’t just fossick for needles inlarge and tangled haystacks. They employ science. In one case before the courts, the team had worked with forensic scientists, comparing paint samples taken from a demolition site in East Maitland to materials in a 3.7-tonne alleged illegal dump, includingasbestos, at Freemans Waterhole.

“The RID officers have an investigating background and skill set,” says Michael Alexander. “This is not just looking for an envelope.”

As well as patrolling on the ground,from bushland to new housing estates, the squaduses aerial surveillance and is about to introduce drones.While the investigators enforce thelaw,they’re alsoinvolved in public education, changinglong-heldviews aboutdumping waste.

“A common misconception is that people think if they own land, theycan bring things on to it, but they can’t, it’s polluting the land,” Mr Robertson says.

Shane Bowker isbased in Singleton and Muswellbrook, andhespends a lot of time talking withfarmers. Thathas helped leadto the clean-up of historical dumps onproperties.

“You are dealing with a lot of farms, it can be generational,” says Mr Bowker, who used to be a council ranger onSydney’s Northern Beaches.“Since we’ve been up in Singleton and Muswellbrook, they’re aware we’re around, we talk to them, including about what they can’t do.”

Driving back along the Hunter Expressway, past the tide of rubbish tossed from vehicle windows, Rob Robertson says illegaldumping affects many.

“People are seeing it as having a significant effect on not just the environment but on landholders, and it affects them as ratepayers,” says Mr Robertson.

“They have to pay for it. So it’s not victimless. Society and the environment are the victims, and society is pushing together and saying it’s not acceptable on any level.”